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JDBC Interview Questions and Answers



Does the JDBC-ODBC Bridge support multiple concurrent open statements per connection?
No. You can open only one Statement object per connection when you are using the JDBC-ODBC Bridge.

What is the query used to display all tables names in SQL Server (Query analyzer)?
select * from information_schema.tables

Why can't I invoke the ResultSet methods afterLast and beforeFirst when the method next works?
You are probably using a driver implemented for the JDBC 1.0 API. You need to upgrade to a JDBC 2.0 driver that implements scrollable result sets. Also be sure that your code has created scrollable result sets and that the DBMS you are using supports them.

How can I retrieve a String or other object type without creating a new object each time?
Creating and garbage collecting potentially large numbers of objects (millions) unnecessarily can really hurt performance. It may be better to provide a way to retrieve data like strings using the JDBC API without always allocating a new object.
We are studying this issue to see if it is an area in which the JDBC API should be improved. Stay tuned, and please send us any comments you have on this question.

How many types of JDBC Drivers are present and what are they?
There are 4 types of JDBC Drivers
Type 1: JDBC-ODBC Bridge Driver
Type 2: Native API Partly Java Driver
Type 3: Network protocol Driver
Type 4: JDBC Net pure Java Driver

What is the fastest type of JDBC driver?
JDBC driver performance will depend on a number of issues:
(a) the quality of the driver code,
(b) the size of the driver code,
(c) the database server and its load,
(d) network topology,
(e) the number of times your request is translated to a different API.
In general, all things being equal, you can assume that the more your request and response change hands, the slower it will be. This means that Type 1 and Type 3 drivers will be slower than Type 2 drivers (the database calls are make at least three translations versus two), and Type 4 drivers are the fastest (only one translation).

There is a method getColumnCount in the JDBC API. Is there a similar method to find the number of rows in a result set?
No, but it is easy to find the number of rows. If you are using a scrollable result set, rs, you can call the methods rs.last and then rs.getRow to find out how many rows rs has. If the result is not scrollable, you can either count the rows by iterating through the result set or get the number of rows by submitting a query with a COUNT column in the SELECT clause.

I would like to download the JDBC-ODBC Bridge for the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition (formerly JDK 1.2). I'm a beginner with the JDBC API, and I would like to start with the Bridge. How do I do it?
The JDBC-ODBC Bridge is bundled with the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition, so there is no need to download it separately.

If I use the JDBC API, do I have to use ODBC underneath?
No, this is just one of many possible solutions. We recommend using a pure Java JDBC technology-enabled driver, type 3 or 4, in order to get all of the benefits of the Java programming language and the JDBC API.

Once I have the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition, from Sun, what else do I need to connect to a database?
You still need to get and install a JDBC technology-enabled driver that supports the database that you are using. There are many drivers available from a variety of sources. You can also try using the JDBC-ODBC Bridge if you have ODBC connectivity set up already. The Bridge comes with the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition, and Enterprise Edition, and it doesn't require any extra setup itself. The Bridge is a normal ODBC client. Note, however, that you should use the JDBC-ODBC Bridge only for experimental prototyping or when you have no other driver available.

What is the best way to generate a universally unique object ID? Do I need to use an external resource like a file or database, or can I do it all in memory?
1: Unique down to the millisecond. Digits 1-8 are the hex encoded lower 32 bits of the System.currentTimeMillis() call.
2: Unique across a cluster. Digits 9-16 are the encoded representation of the 32 bit integer of the underlying IP address.
3: Unique down to the object in a JVM. Digits 17-24 are the hex representation of the call to System.identityHashCode(), which is guaranteed to return distinct integers for distinct objects within a JVM.
4: Unique within an object within a millisecond. Finally digits 25-32 represent a random 32 bit integer generated on every method call using the cryptographically strong java.security.SecureRandom class.

Answer1
There are two reasons to use the random number instead of incrementing your last. 1. The number would be predictable and, depending on what this is used for, you could be opening up a potential security issue. This is why ProcessIDs are randomized on some OSes (AIX for one). 2. You must synchronize on that counter to guarantee that your number isn't reused. Your random number generator need not be synchronized, (though its implementation may be).

Answer2
1) If your using Oracle You can create a sequence ,by which you can generate unique primary key or universal primary key. 2) you can generate by using random numbers but you may have to check the range and check for unique id. ie random number generate 0.0 to 1.0 u may have to make some logic which suits your unique id 3) Set the maximum value into an XML file and read that file at the time of loading your application from xml .

What happens when I close a Connection application obtained from a connection Pool? How does a connection pool maintain the Connections that I had closed through the application?
Answer1
It is the magic of polymorphism, and of Java interface vs. implementation types. Two objects can both be "instanceof" the same interface type, even though they are not of the same implementation type.
When you call "getConnection()" on a pooled connection cache manager object, you get a "logical" connection, something which implements the java.sql.Connection interface.
But it is not the same implementation type as you would get for your Connection, if you directly called getConnection() from a (non-pooled/non-cached) datasource.
So the "close()" that you invoke on the "logical" Connection is not the same "close()" method as the one on the actual underlying "physical" connection hidden by the pool cache manager.
The close() method of the "logical" connection object, while it satisfies the method signature of close() in the java.sql.Connection interface, does not actually close the underlying physical connection.

Answer2
Typically a connection pool keeps the active/in-use connections in a hashtable or other Collection mechanism. I've seen some that use one stack for ready-for-use, one stack for in-use.
When close() is called, whatever the mechanism for indicating inuse/ready-for-use, that connection is either returned to the pool for ready-for-use or else physically closed. Connections pools should have a minimum number of connections open. Any that are closing where the minimum are already available should be physically closed.
Some connection pools periodically test their connections to see if queries work on the ready-for-use connections or they may test that on the close() method before returning to the ready-for-use pool.

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