techpreparation-homepage

Home  Interview Questions  Certifications  Aptitude Questions  Tutorials  Placement Papers  Search  Resume  Soft Skills  Video  Forum  Blog


Technical Interview Questions
Python Interview Questions
C++ Interview Questions
Php Interview Questions
Xml Interview Questions
C Interview Questions
                              .........More

Soft Skills
Communication Skills
Leadership Skills
                              .........More

 

 

  

Perl Interview Questions and Answers



Why do you use Perl?
Perl is a powerful free interpreter.
Perl is portable, flexible and easy to learn.

How do I set environment variables in Perl programs?
you can just do something like this:
$path = $ENV{'PATH'};
As you may remember, "%ENV" is a special hash in Perl that contains the value of all your environment variables.
Because %ENV is a hash, you can set environment variables just as you'd set the value of any Perl hash variable. Here's how you can set your PATH variable to make sure the following four directories are in your path::
$ENV{'PATH'} = '/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/home/yourname/bin';

Which of these is a difference between C++ and Perl?
Perl can have objects whose data cannot be accessed outside its class, but C++ cannot.
Perl can use closures with unreachable private data as objects, and C++ doesn't support closures. Furthermore, C++ does support pointer arithmetic via `int *ip = (int*)&object', allowing you do look all over the object. Perl doesn't have pointer arithmetic. It also doesn't allow `#define private public' to change access rights to foreign objects. On the other hand, once you start poking around in /dev/mem, no one is safe.

How to open and read data files with Perl
Data files are opened in Perl using the open() function. When you open a data file, all you have to do is specify (a) a file handle and (b) the name of the file you want to read from.
As an example, suppose you need to read some data from a file named "checkbook.txt". Here's a simple open statement that opens the checkbook file for read access: open (CHECKBOOK, "checkbook.txt"); In this example, the name "CHECKBOOK" is the file handle that you'll use later when reading from the checkbook.txt data file. Any time you want to read data from the checkbook file, just use the file handle named "CHECKBOOK".
Now that we've opened the checkbook file, we'd like to be able to read what's in it. Here's how to read one line of data from the checkbook file:
$record = < CHECKBOOK > ;
After this statement is executed, the variable $record contains the contents of the first line of the checkbook file. The "<>" symbol is called the line reading operator.
To print every record of information from the checkbook file

open (CHECKBOOK, "checkbook.txt") || die "couldn't open the file!";
while ($record = < CHECKBOOK >) {
print $record;
}
close(CHECKBOOK);

How do I do fill_in_the_blank for each file in a directory?
Here's code that just prints a listing of every file in the current directory:
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
opendir(DIR, ".");
@files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);
foreach $file (@files) {
print "$file\n";
}

How do I do fill_in_the_blank for each file in a directory?

Here's code that just prints a listing of every file in the current directory:
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
opendir(DIR, ".");
@files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);
foreach $file (@files) {
print "$file\n";
}

How do I generate a list of all .html files in a directory?
Here's a snippet of code that just prints a listing of every file in the current directory that ends with the extension .html:
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
opendir(DIR, ".");
@files = grep(/\.html$/,readdir(DIR));
closedir(DIR);
foreach $file (@files) {
print "$file\n";
}

What is Perl one-liner?
There are two ways a Perl script can be run:
--from a command line, called one-liner, that means you type and execute immediately on the command line. You'll need the -e option to start like "C:\ %gt perl -e "print \"Hello\";". One-liner doesn't mean one Perl statement. One-liner may contain many statements in one line.
--from a script file, called Perl program.

Assuming both a local($var) and a my($var) exist, what's the difference between ${var} and ${"var"}?
${var} is the lexical variable $var, and ${"var"} is the dynamic variable $var.
Note that because the second is a symbol table lookup, it is disallowed under `use strict "refs"'. The words global, local, package, symbol table, and dynamic all refer to the kind of variables that local() affects, whereas the other sort, those governed by my(), are variously knows as private, lexical, or scoped variable.

What happens when you return a reference to a private variable?
Perl keeps track of your variables, whether dynamic or otherwise, and doesn't free things before you're done using them.

How to turn on Perl warnings? Why is that important?
Perl is very forgiving of strange and sometimes wrong code, which can mean hours spent searching for bugs and weird results. Turning on warnings helps uncover common mistakes and strange places and save a lot of debugging time in the long run. There are various ways of turning on Perl warnings:
For Perl one-liner, use -w option on the command line.
On Unix or Windows, use the -w option in the shebang line (The first # line in the script). Note: Windows Perl interpreter may not require it.
For other systems, choose compiler warnings, or check compiler documentation.

What are scalar data and scalar variables?
Perl has a flexible concept of data types. Scalar means a single thing, like a number or string. So the Java concept of int, float, double and string equals to Perl\'s scalar in concept and the numbers and strings are exchangeable. Scalar variable is a Perl variable that is used to store scalar data. It uses a dollar sign $ and followed by one or more alphanumeric characters or underscores. It is case sensitive.

Page Numbers :    1         2         3         4         5

Have a Question ? post your questions here. It will be answered as soon as possible.

Check HTML Interview Questions for more HTML Interview Questions with Answers

Check Job Interview Questions for more Interview Questions with Answers